Cappella, Diego

  • “Linea - Digital Intervention” Hahnemüle Fine Art Baryta 325 gsm, Edition of 5 + 2 AP, 35 x 45 inches
  • “Solo - Digital Intervention” Hahnemüle Fine Art Baryta 325 gsm, Edition of 5 + 2 AP, 25 x 53 inches
  • “Back de Revez - Digital Intervention” Hahnemüle Fine Art Baryta 325 gsm, Edition of 10, 21 x 35 inches
  • “Hombre - Digital intervention” Hahnemüle Fine Art Baryta 325 gsm, Edition of 10, 40  x 25 inches, unframed
  • “Frenate - Digital intervention” Hahnemüle Fine Art Baryta 325 gsm, Edition of 10, 21 x 35 inches
  • “Taco - Digital intervention” Chromogenic print on Fujicolor Crystal Archive Pearl Paper, Museum plexi mounting - 1/8 plexiglass and aluminum, Edition of 5 - 30 x 48 inches, Edition of 10 - 30 x 20 inches
  • “A Fondo - Digital Intervention” Hahnemüle Fine Art Baryta 325 gsm, Edition of 10, 30 x 35 inches, unframed
  • “Hook - Digital Intervention” Hahnemüle Fine Art Baryta 325 gsm, Edition of 5 + 2 AP, 30 x 30 inches
  • “Back - Digital Intervention” Chromogenic print on Fujicolor Crystal Archive Pearl Paper, Museum plexi mounting - 1/8 plexiglass and aluminum, Edition of 5 - 32 x 60 inches, Edition of 10 - 16 x 30 inches
  • “Tap - Digital Intervention” Chromogenic print on Fujicolor Crystal Archive Pearl Paper, Museum plexi mounting - 1/8 plexiglass and aluminum, Edition of 5, 30 x 60 inches
  • “Larga - Digital Intervention” Hahnemüle Fine Art Baryta 325 gsm, Edition of 10, 23 x 35 inches
  • “Pegale - Digital Intervention” Hahnemüle Fine Art Baryta 325 gsm, Edition of 10, 24 x 40 inches
  • “Polo I - Digital Intervention” Hahnemüle Fine Art Baryta 325 gsm, Edition of 5 + 2 AP, 30 x 60 and 20 x 40 inches
  • “Polo II - Digital Intervention” Hahnemüle Fine Art Baryta 325 gsm, Edition of 5 + 2 AP, 25 x 60 and 16.5 x 40 inches
  • “Blue Knight - Digital Intervention” Chromogenic print on Fujicolor Crystal Archive Pearl Paper, Museum plexi mounting - 1/8 plexiglass and aluminum, 30 x 48 inches
  • “Air tap - Digital Intervention” Chromogenic print on Fujicolor Crystal Archive Pearl Paper, Museum plexi mounting - 1/8 plexiglass and aluminum, 30 x 48 inches
  • “Run - Digital Intervention” Chromogenic print on Fujicolor Crystal Archive Pearl Paper, Museum plexi mounting - 1/8 plexiglass and aluminum, 30 x 48 inches
  • “Break Away - Digital Intervention” Chromogenic print on Fujicolor Crystal Archive Pearl Paper, Museum plexi mounting - 1/8 plexiglass and aluminum, 30 x 48 inches

American Contemporary

Diego Cappella was born in the City of Buenos Aires, Argentina, in 1971. Being aware that life groups people according to their talents and common interests so that they can develop and grow; he can affirm that his interest began at the age of 5 years old, when his parents, who were linked to the artistic atmosphere, gave him a first approach with a Kodak Instamatic X-35.

With the art in his DNA, his first days took place between television productions and theatre, at a time when the differences between them were very few.

From there he would began to enrich his language, studying in addition, everything that he would consider useful for the purpose of communicating and to communicate: graphic design, art direction, ceremonial and protocol, social communication and of course, photography.

His formal career began as a designer in the publishing industry, which soon led him to produce his own magazine in the City of Miami, “DVOX Magazine.” His interest in searching for new challenges led him to the advertisement world, where he worked for multinationals such as Honda, Coca-Cola, and American Express and where he received multiple awards and recognitions for his works.

He always took photos, always adding to his passion. Far from being a professional change, advertising gave him the experience and stability needed to bring the photography back to the forefront of his life. In 2010, he created his own commercial studio in Miami, Cappella Photography, and from there, the platform to transmit and communicate his artistic potential.

Married with children, the question made by one of them that triggered the change was: Who was Diego Cappella? A Photographer, no doubt.

Fast Polo: A Contemporary Vision

“Fast Polo” shows exactly the way in which I have witnessed the competitions, and that photography has allowed me to capture them. In fact, this project has made me feel as an intermediary, someone that only delivers a message: It is the plot of the time that I capture, thus he is the one who draws the speed, color, even the strength of each image.

The interest for the sport is a given, and to that extent it is a passionate job, but my particular interest is the vision of Polo as a human fact for excellence: competition, distinction and enjoyment, all together and at an amazing speed, as it happens, nowadays, in so many aspects of life.

The project is not intended only for lovers of this sport, but to a wider audience that can share thoughts from different perspectives, perhaps unthinkable: That is why contemporaneity is mentioned rather than any sport consideration, which could be obvious for connoisseurs.

However, I want my work to be an invitation to get to know the singularities of the sport, even throughout its history and its origin, as it happens to ourselves towards the universe. We know something, we glimpse something, and it is extraordinary.

Links

Diego Cappella – Photography in Residential and Commercial Spaces

Diego Cappella – Publications and Advertisements

Diego Cappella – Articles

Interview with Diego Cappella | LivingPolo.com