Reuter-Twining, Diana

  • “Kennel Up” Bronze, 15 x 12.5 x 16 inches, Signed. Here a pack of fox hounds has been asked to “kennel up” which means get back into the kennel (or truck or onto a bench). Hounds have such beautiful heads and athletic bodies. The three hounds on the front and sides hold back the entire pack from falling off the base. The only thing I couldn’t provide was the magic of their voices.
  • “Kennel Up” (other view) Bronze, 15 x 12.5 x 16 inches, Signed. Here a pack of fox hounds has been asked to “kennel up” which means get back into the kennel (or truck or onto a bench). Hounds have such beautiful heads and athletic bodies. The three hounds on the front and sides hold back the entire pack from falling off the base. The only thing I couldn’t provide was the magic of their voices.
  • “Kennel Up” (detail) Bronze, 15 x 12.5 x 16 inches, Signed. Here a pack of fox hounds has been asked to “kennel up” which means get back into the kennel (or truck or onto a bench). Hounds have such beautiful heads and athletic bodies. The three hounds on the front and sides hold back the entire pack from falling off the base. The only thing I couldn’t provide was the magic of their voices.
  • “Rendez-Vous” Bronze, Edition of 12, 15 x 21 x 7 inches, Signed & Numbered. Horses silhouetted in the fields are all I ever really see of their detail. How beautiful when they groom each other and become a large whole. Stolid in their simplicity and nuturing, they become a classical stone carving.
  • “Happy” Bronze, Edition of 9, 18 x 11 x 16 inches, Signed & Numbered. The english setter has evolved over time to be both elegant and agile. They are regal and handsome with coats which are usually long and silky. I chose to sculpt one of our dogs, Happy, at the moment that he is offering the quail to me. He is proud and gentle and knows that he has done what was asked of him.
  • “Under Cover” Bronze (Cire perdue) Edition of 12, This sculpture is available in two sizes: Display and Monumental, 4 x 9 x 4 inches, 66 x 50 x 27 inches, Signed & Numbered
  • “Under Cover” (Detail) Bronze (Cire perdue) Edition of 12, This sculpture is available in two sizes: Display and Monumental, 4 x 9 x 4 inches, 66 x 50 x 27 inches, Signed & Numbered
  • “Under Cover” (Monumental) Bronze (Cire perdue) Edition of 12, This sculpture is available in two sizes: Display and Monumental, 4 x 9 x 4 inches, 66 x 50 x 27 inches, Signed & Numbered
  • “Grenouille Address Plaque” Bas Relief, 13 x 13 x .25 inches, Bronze - This is designed to be included in interior or exterior wall applications and can be ordered as an address plaque.
  • “Frog Bowl” Bronze (Cire perdue) 12 inch diameter, Edition of 21, Signed & Numbered - The Frog Bowl is meant as a piece that can be sculpture or decorative art. Throughout the world, frogs provide the chorus of the hidden world. This is a southern tree frog, (shown much larger than in life), which clings to everything and can hop in grand leaps.

American Contemporary

Having been trained first as an architect and photographer, Diana has the vantage point of an intimacy with space and nature, which is made evident through her use of a bold stroke and a quick eye.

Diana’s interest in art and architecture may have started after she assisted her father on a photographic assignment for the National Geographic. Diana went on to apprentice as a photographer with the magazine. She later became a registered architect.

Her formal studies in art and architecture initially took her to Paris with Hollins College where she received a degree in Art History. She then went on to Catholic University where she received her Masters of Architecture. She studied sculpture at the Corcoran School of Art, Loveland Academy of Fine Arts and Scottsdale Artists’ School.

Living in rural communities in the Southern United States and the American West has given Diana the opportunity to study in detail that which has become the focus of her work; the natural world. Her years in Southern Africa exposed her to the philosophy of conservation science which forever changed her life and has inspired her to catalogue the frail balance of nature and man. Through her art, Diana hopes to engage people in being stewards of the natural world and its habitats.

Diana’s bronzes are found in gardens throughout the United States, Europe, and Africa as well as private collections.