Le May, Camilla

  • Thoroughbred Bust, Bronze, Edition of 9, 40 x 30 x 12 cm
  • Thoroughbred Mare & Foal, Bronze, Edition of 9, 33 x 47 x 20 cm
  • Polo Pony Bust, Bronze, Edition of 9, 40 x 30 x 12 cm
  • Anglo Arab cross Warmblood, Bronze, Edition of 9,  40 x 37 x 23 cm
  • Dachshunds, Bronze, Edition of 3, 17 x 50 x 37 cm
  • Young Cheetah, Bronze, Edition of 9, 44 x 25 x 13 cm
  • Buffalo Bull, Bronze, Edition of 12, 41 x 68 x 31 cm
  • Little Fox, Bronze, Edition of 9, 12 x 23 x 7 cm
  • Baby Elly and Warthog, Bronze, Edition of 12, 16 x 51 x 14 cm
  • Baby Camels, Bronze, 19 x 38 x 12 cm
  • Ostrich Family, Bronze, Edition of 9, 32 x 91 x 18 cm
  • Little Hare, Bronze, Edition of 20, 13 cm high
  • Jackass Penguins, Bronze, Edition of 9, 21 x 23 x 11 cm
  • Toad, Bronze, Edition of 12, 6 x 12 x 7 cm

British Contemporary

Exquisitely detailed wildlife bronzes…” Exhibitions Guide 2007

Camilla had a passion for sculpting from school, but it was only in 1996 after encouragement from the late Sir Eduardo Paolozzi that she decided to pursue this seriously. Since 2000 her work has been exhibited and sold by established galleries (mainly in UK and South Africa) and awards include: The British Sporting Art Trust Sculpture Award, highly commended in 2007 and The Society of Wildlife Artists Bursary Awards 1999 & 2000. Her work is in private art collections worldwide.

Camilla’s work is modelled in clay or wax, then cast in bronze limited editions (she casts a few pieces in bronze resin). Having worked at bronze foundries she is particular about finish, doing all the waxwork, final chasing and many of the patinas herself. Her love of animals / wildlife and wilderness areas was initially fostered by growing up on her parents’ farm and by spending her youth riding. After an inspiring first trip to S.Africa in 1999 to study the wildlife for her work, she returned there for several years to sculpt and teach but is presently in East Sussex, returning to Africa for inspiration whenever possible.

Central is anatomy and form, as well as capturing a typical pose to best portray the subjects character. For this she finds it is crucial to sculpt directly from life as much as is possible, ideally in the animal’s natural surroundings.

Camilla is presently artist in residence at the Royal Veterinary College for whom she has done a life size sculpture of Sefton- the Household Cavalry horse that survived the bomb in Hyde Park in 1982. This is presently being cast in bronze for unveiling later this year.

All works illustrated here are bronze and in limited editions of 3, 9 or 12.