About Jeanne Chisholm

After reviewing the charter for the New York State Council on the Arts, drafted by Nelson D. Rockefeller, in her post as Assistant Chief of Staff for Governor Hugh Carey, Jeanne Suydam left in 1975 to start the Suydam Gallery in a townhouse on Manhattan’s Upper East Side. Her inspiration was the great work of Betty Parsons, the den mother of Abstract Expressionism who championed the work of numerous young artists including New York School standouts Jackson Pollack, Mark Rothko, Clifford Still, Barnett Newman, Hans Hoffman, and Ad Reinhardt.

Jeanne’s interest in sporting art was fostered at a young age, having been raised in an equestrian environment. This interest became a passion upon meeting and marrying Hugh Jeremy Chisholm, former Wall Street banker, rancher, and avid polo player. The two started the Chisholm Gallery at the Palm Beach Polo & Country Club at the invitation of founder William Ylvisaker.

Jeanne Chisholm and Sir Winston
Jeanne and her work have been featured in numerous publications including Architectural Digest, Town and Country, The New York Times, The Washington Post, W, Women’s Wear Daily, US, Quest, Avenue Magazine, Polo Magazine, Equine Visions, Palm Beach Life, the Palm Beach Daily News, and Sidelines, as well as publications local to her new Pine Plains location including the Country and Abroad, Chronogram, and the Taconic Press. Works from her gallery have served as the illustrations for numerous books including A Glorious Victory, A Glorious Defeat: Buck’s Club and the International Polo Matches of 1921 by Nigel à Brassard, and The World of Polo Past & Present by J.N.P. Watson.

Jeanne chose to move her gallery from Palm Beach after the realization of the National Polo Museum and Hall of Fame, an idea first promoted by her late husband in the 1970s. Jeanne served as the Coordinating Director of the museum, and having brought the idea to fruition, felt the desire for change. What could answer that desire more fully than the changing of the seasons?

So it was the four seasons that drew the Chisholm Gallery to New York’s Hudson Valley, along with the close proximity to New York City, Saratoga Springs, the Berkshires, and unparalleled access to the arts, neighboring polo clubs and northern horse shows.